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Greece begins receiving international flights … these are entry requirements

Source: Samar Almashta – Arabic

After a decade of economic decline, during which the country witnessed 3 financial bailouts, Greece today is proud to be the largest European success story in dealing with the Corona pandemic, with a total death toll of less than two hundred people, and sets a list of conditions to receive tourists this summer.

On Monday, the country was reopened to the first international flights scheduled to reach Athens and the largest cities in Thessaloniki, and although entry rules differ according to the place of arrival now, as of July 1, all restrictions will be lifted, with some exceptions.

Flights will be resumed to regional airports, including islands such as Santorini. Despite fears of a second wave of the epidemic with the influx of visitors, tourism represents a fifth of the Greek economy and more than a quarter of jobs, as Greece welcomed 34 million visitors last year.

According to Greek Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis, the continuation of the closure is no longer an option, in addition to taking into account the procedures for spacing and sterilization in all hotels, restaurants and tourist destinations.

The Greek plan allows quarantine-free admission that random Covid-19 checks are carried out at its airports for tourists from 29 countries classified as least dangerous, such as Australia, New Zealand, Germany and Lebanon. Quarantine for 14 days is applied to those who are infected.

While all travelers coming from some airports in Britain, Europe, America and Asia that are considered less safe, will be examined upon arrival, and they must stay in a designated hotel for one night while waiting for the results of the Covid-19 test and if the result is negative, travelers face mandatory self-isolation for a period of seven Days at the destination of their choice. If the virus is confirmed, they are kept under observation for 14 days in Athens.

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Source: Alarabiya

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